The literary voyager; or, Muzzeniegun. by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

Cover of: The literary voyager; or, Muzzeniegun. | Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

Published by Greenwood Press in Westport, Conn .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Indians of North America -- Periodicals.,
  • Ojibwa Indians -- Periodicals.

Edition Notes

Book details

Other titlesMuzzeniegun.
StatementEdited with an introd. by Philip P. Mason.
ContributionsSchoolcraft, Henry Rowe, 1793-1864.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE75 .S36 1974
The Physical Object
Paginationxxvi, 193 p.
Number of Pages193
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5051217M
ISBN 100837177243
LC Control Number74012581
OCLC/WorldCa1031142

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Edited, with an introduction, by Philip P. Mason. [Henry Rowe (Philip P. Mason, ed.) Schoolcraft] on *FREE. An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip.

Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio An illustration of a " floppy disk. The Literary Voyager Or Muzzeniegun by Philip Publication date Publisher Michigan State University press Collection universallibrary Contributor. General Description and Notes: According to Littlefield and Parins, The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager was a manuscript magazine devoted to the life, history, customs, tribal news of the Ojibwa Indians, as well as poetry, essays and information on western living and Mexican civilization.

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Librivox Free Audiobook. Church for Life NeedLove Records Presents: Full text of "The Literary Voyager Or Muzzeniegun". The literary voyager, or, Muzzeniegun / Schoolcraft ; edited About this Book.

Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, View full catalog record. Rights. 12 Books That Should Go On a Literary Voyager Spacecraft Golden Record Rah Froemming-Carter The Voyager Spacecraft, both launched inare famous for carrying phonograph records with them. These records contained a collection of sounds, greetings, and images, designed to portray the diversity of life on Earth to any.

The Literary Voyager, also known as The Muzzeniegun (Ojibwe for ‘book’, also spelled Muzzinyegun) was a manuscript magazine produced by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft between December of and April offor a total of 16 issues. The literary voyager; or, Muzzeniegun The literary voyager; or Henry Rowe Schoolcraft.

Muzzeniegun. book First published in 3 editions — 1 previewable Borrow Listen. Download for print-disabled History of the Indian tribes of the United States Accessible book, Indians of North America, Description and travel.

To pass the long northern winters in andHenry assembled a handwritten magazine, the Literary Voyager, or Muzzeniegun, consisting mostly of his own writings but with work by others as well, including works by Jane, mostly The literary voyager; or and stories. Depending heavily on Jane and her family, Henry became an influential founder of American.

Schoolcraft also wrote biographical stories, speeches and poems that were published in The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun. References Jaskoski, H. Early Native American Writing: New Critical Essays. Littlefield, D. Native American writing in the Southeast: an anthology, Swann, B. Schoolcraft created The Muzzeniegun, or Literary Voyager, a family magazine which he and Jane produced in the winter of – and circulated among friends ("muzzeniegun" being Ojibwe for book).

It contained mostly his own writings, although he did include a few pieces from his wife and a. With the help of her husband, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, she published many of her poems in the magazine The literary voyager, or, Muzzeniegun, edited by Schoolcraft.

The poem is composed in nine line stanzas–with the exception of the first couplet at the beginning of the poem. The most informative of them was the Literary Voyager prepared weekly by Schoolcraft at Sault Ste.

Marie during the winter of This magazine, which Schoolcraft later gave the subtitle, "Muzzeniegun," an Ojibwa word meaning a printed document or book, contained articles, poems, and announcements on all aspects of Native American life and. Jane’s writings reached a relatively wide audience during her lifetime through The Literary Voyager, or Muzzeniegun, the magazine she and her husband published together from.

The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, ); David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins, American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, ), The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, ); David F.

Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins, American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, ), In andSchoolcraft’s husband compiled a handwritten magazine, The Literary Voyager, or Muzzeniegun (Philip P. Mason, ), that contained several of her poems.

Inthey moved together to New York City after Henry Schoolcraft was dismissed from his post as a federal agent. The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun by Henry R. Schoolcraft, Philip R. Mason The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun by Henry R. Schoolcraft, Philip R.

Mason (pp. ) Review by: Gertrude P. Kurath. As far as most scholars know, Schoolcraft never published printed books of her writing. Her largest audience came from readers of The Muzzeniegun, or, Literary Voyager, a handwritten literary magazine she co-edited and co-published in the mid s with her husband Henry Schoolcraft, who was involved in governmental work on “Indian affairs.”.

Her essays can be found in “Literary Voyager” also known as “Muzzeniegun” the periodical they jointly published in Sault Ste. Marie, Detroit, and New York.

Her stories were additionally published in adapted versions by her husband, and became a key source for Longfellow’s epic poem ‘The Song of Hiawatha.’. () The literary voyager or Muzzeniegun. Philip P. Mason. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press.

East Lansing: Michigan State University Press. Thompson, Stith. This mediation enabled Schoolcraft to later help her hus- band, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (– ), to publish over twenty books and a number of articles on Native Americans. Inthe couple founded the journal The Literary Voyager, or Muzzeniegun.

Henry Rowe Schoolcraft has books on Goodreads with ratings. Henry Rowe Schoolcraft’s most popular book is The American Indians Their History, Co. To pass the time in the winter ofHenry Rowe Schoolcraft put together a literary magazine.

He titled the hand-written magazine, “Literary Voyager,” or, in Ojibwe, “The Muzzeniegun.” Henry’s writing comprised most of the magazine’s contents, but he did include some of. Mason (ed.), Schoolcraft's The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun, by Ruth Lapham Butler. Wisehart, Sam Houston: American Giant, by Kenneth R.

Walker. Ridge, Ignatius Donnelly: The Portrait of a Politician, by Thomas Richard Ross. Auer (ed.), Antislavery and Disunion, Studies in the Rhetoric.

Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, also known as Bamewawagezhikaquay (Janu – ) is the one of earliest Native American literary writers. She was of Ojibwa and Scots-Irish ancestry.

Her Ojibwa name can also be written as O-bah-bahm-wawa-ge-zhe-go-qua (Obabaamwewe-giizhigokwe in modern spelling), meaning "Woman of the Sound [that the stars make] Rushing Through the Sky.". Abstract. Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, or Bamewawagezhikaquay, wrote brilliantly fashioned Ojibwe stories.

Focusing on four of her contributions to the Muzzeniegun, including a letter to the editor (her husband, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft), the author argues for Schoolcraft’s adherence to Ojibwe aesthetic approach is important because three of the stories above were republished by.

The Online Books Page. Online Books by. Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, ) Online books about this author are available, as is a Wikipedia article. Schoolcraft, Henry Rowe, An Address, Delivered Before the Was-Ah Ho-De-No-Son-Ne or New Confederacy of the Iroquois, by Henry R.

Schoolcraft, a Member, at its Third Annual Council, Aug ; Also. Philip P. Mason is the author of Rum Running and the Roaring Twenties ( avg rating, 13 ratings, 1 review, published ), Tracy W. McGregor ( av /5(5). ^Philip P. Mason, ed., Schoolcraft: The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, ), Chippewa Reverence for Copper Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Philip P Mason books online.

Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun.

Philip P Mason. 30 Aug Paperback. unavailable. Try AbeBooks. Labor History Archives in the United States. Author. She earned this reputation even though all of her writing appeared in one magazine, The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun, published by Jane and her husband, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, the noted documenter of Native American life and customs.

The magazine was an outgrowth of a reading society established by the Schoolcrafts among the American and. The Literary Voyager, also known as The Muzzeniegun was a manuscript magazine produced by Henry Rowe Schoolcraft between December of and April offor a total of 16 issues.

It is recognized as the first magazine published in Michigan, as well as the first periodical pertaining to Native American culture and mythology. Nindinendam Sung by Margaret Noodin Jane Johnston Schoolcraft Baamewaawaagizhigokwe “Woman of the Sound the Stars Make Rushing Through the Sky” () Jane Johnston Schoolcraft was born in Sault Ste.

Marie. An Ojibwe (Chippewa, Anishinaabe) and the granddaughter of the revered chief Waubojeeg, she began as early as to write poetry and traditional stories while [ ].

Biography from the Dictionary of Canadian Biography. [Francis Assikinack wrote three essays for the Canadian Journal at the request of Daniel Wilson* while he was chief clerk for the Indian Department in the office of the central Indian superintendent.

The first, “Legends and traditions of the Odahwah Indians,” new ser., iii (), –25, presented some legends and discussed symbolism. American Literature: Beginnings through Civil War.

ENGL Fall 08/22/ - 12/11/. American Literature: Beginnings through Civil War. ENGL Spring 01/17/ - 05/13/  Oliver Wendell Holmes Oliver Wendell Holmes worked at the National Archives beginning inserving in many capacities including Executive Director of the National Historical Publications Commission.

He served as Fellow of the Society of American Archivists (SAA) fromand the President of the SAA from He was active in international archival affairs and.Jane Johnston Schoolcraft, also known as Bamewawagezhikaquay (Janu - ) is the first known Native American poet and literary writer.

She was of Ojibwa and Scots-Irish ancestry. Her Ojibwa name can also be written as O-bah-bahm-wawa-ge-zhe-go-qua (Obabaamwewe-giizhigokwe in modern spelling), meaning "Woman of the Sound [that the stars make] Rushing Through the Sky." 1.

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